Programming

Programming
     A computer programmer creates the code for software applications and operating systems. After a software developer or computer software engineer designs a computer program, the programmer writes code that converts that design into a set of instructions a computer can follow. Programmers test the program to look for errors and then rewrite it until it is debugged, or error‐free. A programmer continues to evaluate programs that are in use, making updates and adjustments as needed. The application of programming is applied through game design. A video game designer will come up with a concept that will eventually become a video game and see that idea through to fruition. They will work with other members of the development team, including artists, programmers and audio engineers. Video game design jobs are not entry‐level positions — one will have to work up to this position by working in other jobs in the field. Video game design jobs include game designer, lead designer and level designer. A video game job is possible, but a job working as a video game designer is usually earned from years of experience doing other work in this field. Fortunately there are many types of jobs from which to choose, both on the technical side and on the business side of the industry.
     The information technology industry, including programming, is a dynamic and entrepreneurial field that continues to have a revolutionary impact on the economy and on the world. Students in information technology learn and practice skills that prepare them for diverse post‐high school education and training opportunities, from apprenticeships and two‐year college programs to four‐year college and graduate programs.


Programming Pathway

Introduction to Digital Technology 11.41500
Computer Science Principles 11.47100
Programming, Games, Apps and Society 11.47200

Introduction to Digital Technology 11.41500
     Introduction to Digital Technology is designed for high school students to understand, communicate, and adapt to a digital world as it impacts their personal life, society, and the business world. Exposure to foundational knowledge in hardware, software, programming, web design, IT support, and networks are all taught in a computer lab with hands- on activities and project-focused tasks. Students will not only understand the concepts, but apply their knowledge to situations and defend their actions/decisions/choices through the knowledge and skills acquired in this course. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Various forms of technologies will be highlighted to expose students to the emerging technologies impacting the digital world. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are taught in this course as a foundational knowledge to prepare students to be college and career ready. The knowledge and skills taught in this course build upon each other to form a comprehensive introduction to digital world.

Computer Science Principles 11.47100
     How can computing change the world? What is computer science? Engage your creativity, demonstrate and build your problem solving ability all while connecting the relevance of computer science to the society! Computer Science (CS) Principles is an intellectually rich and engaging course that is focused on building a solid understanding and foundation in computer science. This course emphasizes the content,practices, thinking and skills central to the discipline of computer science. Through both its content and pedagogy, this course aims to appeal to a broad audience. The focus of this course will fall into these computational thinking practices: connecting computing, developing computational artifacts, abstracting,analyzing problems and artifacts, communicating, and collaborating.
     Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources and application of computer science. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry.
     Computer Science Principles is the second course in the pathways Programming and ComputerScience in the Information Technology Cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology.

Programming, Games, Apps and Society 11.47200
     Are you ready to design and develop? The course is designed for high school students to strategize,design, and develop games and mobile and desktop applications that can be produced in the real world. Students will learn about life-cycles of project development and use models to develop applications. Attention will be placed on how user interfaces affect the usability and effectiveness of a game or an application. Programming constructs will be employed which will allow students’ applications to interact with “real world,” stimuli. The course exposes students to privacy, legality,and security considerations with regards to the software industry.
     Various forms of technologies will be used to expose students to resources, software, and applications of programming. Professional communication skills and practices, problem-solving,ethical and legal issues, and the impact of effective presentation skills are enhanced in this course to prepare students to be college and career ready. Employability skills are integrated into activities, tasks, and projects throughout the course standards to demonstrate the skills required by business and industry. Competencies in the co-curricular student organization, Future BusinessLeaders of America (FBLA), are integral components of the employability skills standard for this course.
     Programming, Games, Apps and Society is the third course in the Programming pathway in theInformation Technology cluster. Students enrolled in this course should have successfully completed Introduction to Digital Technology and Computer Science Principles. After mastery of the standards in this course, students should be prepared to take the end of pathway assessment in this career area.



Related Pathway Occupations:
Software Engineers
Computer Programmers
Computer & Information Systems Managers
Computer Hardware Engineers
Computer Network Architects
Computer System Analysts
Database Administrators

Other Related Information Technology Occupations:
Information Security Analysts
Network & Computer Systems Administrators
Video Game Designers
Game Designers




Average
Annual Salary
$75,000 - $90,000